Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Strawberry Harvest

June has come to us clad in her rich green cloak trimmed with the frothy white of Queen Anne's Lace.  The humble yellow and white flowers of honeysuckle sweetly perfume the air while their vines scramble toward the sun.  Warm nights showcase the first tentative twinklings of amorous fireflies.

While early June may seem a time of plenty at first glance, garden produce can be rather scarce.  A few very hot days in May resulted in bolting lettuce and bitter radicchio, although the ruby stemmed Swiss chard stands resolute.  The filling pea pods hang heavy on the vine, but are not quite ready yet.  Tomato plants begin to put on spidery yellow blooms and round swellings on the bean plants hint at the harvest to come.



There is one very welcome early June crop, however.  Deep crimson strawberries hang heavy from their stems in my Garden Barrels.  These are first year plants, but are bearing quite heavily.  Every other day, I pick a pound or so of sweet living rubies and tuck what I don't eat still warm from the sun carefully into the freezer so I can enjoy the sweetness of June again in December.  It has been a joy to pick clean, perfectly formed berries that never touch the ground while still standing on my own two feet.  I have not had to pull a single weed, either.  My only chore for this harvest has been to turn the drip system on every other day, and clip the determined runners from the plants so they can put their energy into bearing.  I will only take daughter plants from the best producers, and I don't know which ones they are yet.

As the warm days of June meander into the heat of July, the garden's bounty will ebb and flow in an ever-changing tide.  The peas will come and go just as the beans are ready to harvest.  Tomatoes and peppers will bloom, swell, and ripen.  Herbs will put out their fragrant leaves to be harvested and dried for winter. 

How can anyone with a garden ever be bored??


2 comments:

  1. Visitei seu blog e passeei por todos os seus posts,
    identifiquei-me com sua experiência de viver com simplicidade e autossustentabilidade.Amei o trabalho de vocês. No nosso pequeno quintal tentamos escrever nossa história construindo um pequeno paraíso e evitando estragar o mundo pela nossa sobrevivência. Obrigada por partilhar sua vida conosco.

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    1. Thanks so much for your kind comments. I am enjoying this journey very much and strive to make everything in my life both useful and beautiful. I hope you're work toward simplicity and care of our Mother Earth is a joy to you as well.

      Melwynnd

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